Compliance Managers Guidebook & Reference: The Responsibility of Compliance Managers Is Growing And It Is Vital They Have Their Finger On The Pulse

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Instruction book on how to conduct a role under UK regulatory requirements for a firm to meet compliance. The Responsibility of Compliance Managers Is Growing And It Is Vital They Have Their Finger On The Pulse As a UK Financial Services Regulatory Compliance Manager who wants to make sure they have all bases covered before any regulatory visit; or maybe you want to know the secret tips of compliance risk assessments and business or operational risks; or perhaps you are new in the job and want insights into hot-topics, enforcement and regulatory methodologies and best practice. If so then the Compliance Manager Guidebook & Reference is written for you. Regulatory Compliance is constantly changing and many people need to know; What do the latest changes mean? What changes have happened to the regulatory Handbooks? What impact does this have on the sales process? Does the documentation need to be changed? Does or sales process need to be amended? Whenever these questions are asked, everyone turns toward “compliance” to ask them. If you are new or an old hand, you need to know what the latest changes are and how to apply the requirements to your firm. If you need any of this and need to develop the role of the compliance officer within the compliance function or the the whole firm then help is at hand. If you are hoping to discover the impacts on compliance and identify areas that cause concern to most compliance professionals, then you’re about to discover how to start improving, right now! In fact, we will deal with a number of aspects of the role of the Compliance Manager concerning the regulators and the regulators current perspective and hotspots, with this Kindle Ebook “Compliance Manager Guidebook,” the best selling Ebook of it’s type, which gives you the answers to 17 important questions and challenges every Compliance Manager faces, including: The regulatory terrain; how did it evolve to today’s landscape? How do you map your firm’s activities to the complianc

PCI Dss: A Pocket Guide: Third Edition (Compliance)

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All businesses that accept payment cards are prey for hackers and criminal gangs trying to steal payment card details and commit identity fraud. The PCI DSS (Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard) exists to ensure that businesses process credit and debit card orders in a way that effectively protects cardholder data. Failing to comply with the standard can have serious consequences for your ability to process card payments. THis pocket guide is an ideal introduction and a quick reference to PCI DSS, including version 3.0. Co-written by a PCI QSA (Qualified Security Assessor) and updated to also cover PCI DSS version 3.0, this handy pocket guide provides all the information you need to consider as you approach the PCI DSS. It is also an ideal training resource for anyone in your organisation who deals with payment card processing.

The First Great Financial Crisis of the 21st Century:A Retrospective (World Scientific-Now Publishers Series in Business)

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Although there have been numerous studies of the causes and consequences of the Great Financial Crisis of 2007–2010 in the US and abroad, many of these were undertaken only for a small number of countries and before the financial and economic effects were fully realized and before various governmental policy responses were decided upon and actually implemented. This book aims to fill these voids by providing a more thorough assessment now that the worst events and the regulatory reforms are sufficiently behind us and much more information about these developments is available. It reviews and analyzes the causes and consequences of and the regulatory responses to the Great Financial Crisis, particularly from a public policy viewpoint. In the process, it explores such intriguing questions as: What caused the crisis? How did the crisis differ across countries? What is the outlook for another crisis, and when? This is a must read for those who are trying to find answers to these questions.

2017 New Client Questionnaire – Compliance, Risk management & Governance

Ambulance Services: Leadership and Management Perspectives

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£64.74

This volume provides fresh insights and management understanding of the changing role of the ambulance services against the backdrop of massive cuts in health budgets around the world and the changing context of pre-hospital care within the wider healthcare networks. The challenges of funding, training and cultural transformation are now felt globally. The need to learn and adapt from suitable models of ambulance service delivery have never been greater. The book offers critical insights into the theory and practice of strategic and operational management of ambulance services and the leadership needs for the service. One of the highlight of this volume is to bring together scholarship using experts- academics, practitioners and professionals in the field, to each of the chosen topics. The chapters are based in the practical experiences of the authors and are written in a way that is accessible and suitable for a range of audiences. We are confident that this book will cater to a wider audience to inform policy and practice, both in the UK and internationally. Paresh Wankhade is Professor of Leadership and Management at Edge Hill University, UK Kevin Mackway-Jones is the Medical Director at North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust, UK Endorsements “This unique and valuable publication, charts the history and development of the ambulance service in England over the last hundred years or so. The role of this key emergency service h as always been important, and arguably never more so than today. The contributing authors have not only provided the reader with great insights into where the service has come from and the leadership challenges it has, and continues to face; it also gives examples of how the future could look as our journey of transformation continues.” Peter Bradley CBE, MBA (and author of Taking Healthcare to the Patient 2005), Chief Executive Officer. St John National Headquarters, New Zealand “With a year on year increase in demand for emergency ambula

Right To Information Act, 2005

Introduction:

This legislation may be termed as one of the rarest legislations in the Indian Legal History which provides for setting out the practical regime of ‘Right to Information’ for Citizens to secure access to information under the control of public authorities and in order to promote transparency & accountability in the working of every public authority, the constitution of a Central Information Commission and State Information Commissions and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto.

This Legislation will prove to be a ‘Landmark’, since it is enacted NOT for the people to follow but for the Government to follow.

Through this legislation, the Government has made an attempt to administer itself, be answerable to the people & penalize itself for lacking in providing the required information and regain people’s lost confidence in the bureaucratic system and setup.

Extent and Commencement:

This Act extends to the whole of India except the State of Jammu and Kashmir. This Act of Parliament received the assent of the President of India on the 15th June, 2005.

Some Important Definitions:

1. Information [Section 2(f)]:

Information means any material in any form, including records, documents, memos, e-mails, opinions, advices, press releases, circulars, orders, logbooks, contracts, reports, papers, samples, models, data material held in any electronic form and information relating to any private body which can be accessed by a public authority under any other law for the time being in force.

2. Record [Section 2(i)]:

Record includes-

(a) any document, manuscript and file;

(b) any microfilm, microfiche and facsimile copy of a document;

(c) any reproduction of image or images embodied in such microfilm

(whether enlarged or not)

(d) any other material produced by a computer or any other device.

3. Right to Information [Section 2(j)]:

Right to Information means the right to information accessible under this Act which is held by or under the control of any public authority and includes the right to –

(i) inspection of work, documents, records;

(ii) taking notes, extracts or certified copies of documents or records;

(iii) taking certified samples of material;

(iv) obtaining information in the form of diskettes, floppies, tapes, video cassettes or in any other electronic mode or through printouts where such information is stored in a computer or in any other device.

4. Public Authority [Section 2(h)]:

Public Authority means any authority or body or institution of self- government established or constituted-

(a) by or under the Constitution;

(b) by any other law made by Parliament;

(c) by any other law made by State Legislature;

(d) by notification issued or order made by the appropriate Government,

and includes any-

(i) body owned, controlled or substantially financed;

(ii) non-Government organisation substantially financed, directly or indirectly by funds provided by the appropriate Government;

Exemption from disclosure of information [Section 8]:

Like any other legislation, this Act also provides for exemptions to the Government from disclosure of information regarding information – which would cause a breach of privilege of Parliament or the State Legislature / harm the competitive position of a third party / endanger the life or physical safety of any person / impede the process of investigation or apprehension or prosecution of offenders / weaken confidence of the Foreign Government / Disclose the Records of deliberations of the Council of Ministers, Secretaries and other Officers / relates to personal information which has no relationship to any public activity or interest, or which would cause unwarranted invasion of the privacy of the individual unless the Central Public Information Officer or the State Public Information Officer or the appellate authority, as the case may be, is satisfied that the larger public interest justifies the disclosure of such information / involve infringement of copyright.

IMPACT: To hide or avoid giving the required information demanded, the Officers of the concerned Public Authorities may resort to take advantage of these Exemptions. Hence it may be necessary for the ‘Information Seeker’ to be clear in his mind about the exact interpretation of the provisions and exemptions so that he may not be taken for a ride by the officials and can claim his Right to information rightfully.

Administration of the Act [Section 12]:

A body to be known as the ‘Central Information Commission’ is constituted to exercise the powers conferred on, and to perform the functions assigned to, it under this Act. The Central Information Commission shall consist of- The Chief Information Commissioner and such number of Central Information Commissioners as may be deemed necessary.

Every State Government shall constitute a body to be known as the

(name of the State) Information Commission to exercise the powers conferred on, and to perform the functions assigned to, it under this Act. The State Information Commission shall consist of- The State Chief Information Commissioner and such number of State Information Commissioners as may be deemed necessary.

The Central Information Commission or State Information Commission shall, while inquiring into any matter under this section, have the same powers as are vested in a civil court while trying a suit under the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908.

Every public authority shall designate as many officers as the Central Public Information Officers or State Public Information Officers, as the case may be, in all administrative units or offices under it as may be necessary to provide information to persons requesting for the information under this Act. Every public authority shall designate an officer at each sub-divisional level or other sub-district level as a Central Assistant Public Information Officer or a State Assistant Public Information Officer, as the case may be, to receive the applications for information or appeals under this Act for forwarding the same forthwith to the Central Public Information Officer or the State Public Information Officer or senior officer specified or the Central Information Commission or the State Information Commission, as the case may be.

Timeframes within which the desired information should be made available by the concerned Public Authority:

A person who desires to obtain any information shall make a request in writing or through electronic means in English or Hindi or in the official language of the area in which the application is being made, accompanying such fee as may be prescribed, to-

(a) the Central Public Information Officer or State Public Information Officer, as the case may be, of the concerned public authority;

(b) the Central Assistant Public Information Officer or State Assistant Public Information Officer, as the case may be, specifying the particulars of the information sought by him or her.

An applicant making request for information shall not be required to give any reason for requesting the information or any other personal details except those that may be necessary for contacting him.

On receipt of a request the Central Public Information Officer or State Public Information Officer shall as expeditiously as possible, and in any case within Thirty Days of the receipt of the request, either provide the information on payment of such fee as may be prescribed or reject the request for a reason. If the Central Public Information Officer or State Public Information Officer fails to give decision on the request for information within the said period it shall be deemed to have refused the request. The person making request for the information shall be provided the information free of charge where a public authority fails to comply with the time limits specified.

IMPACT: Making requests for information through electronic means may not be easy practically, since not all the Public Authority offices are fully computerized and may not have computer savvy staff. The urban class who may resort to make request through electronic means may get discouraged. Explanations like, ‘Computer error’, ‘Server down’ may be resorted to, for avoiding furnishing of information.

Penalties for not making available the desired information:

If without any reasonable cause, the concerned Officer refuses to receive an application for information or has not furnished information within the time specified or malafidely denied the request for information or knowingly given incorrect, incomplete or misleading information or destroyed information which was the subject of the request or obstructed in any manner in furnishing the information, a penalty of two hundred and fifty rupees each day till application is received or information is furnished, so however, the total amount of such penalty shall not exceed twenty-five thousand rupees shall be imposed and / or disciplinary action against the concerned Officer may be taken. Provided that the Central Public Information Officer or the State Public Information Officer, as the case may be, shall be given a reasonable opportunity of being heard before any penalty is imposed or disciplinary action is taken against him.

CONCLUSION:

The enactment of the Right to Information Act, 2005 makes a noteworthy attempt to streamline the working of the Public Authorities in respect of providing information to the people. The Authorities will require being technology savvy, alert and need to imbibe in them the not before attitude, of being answerable to the citizens. The Public Authorities will now require tightening their belts so as to serve the people and truly contribute to the Information Technology era. As for the citizens, this Act makes them aware of their one of the Constitutional Rights – Right to Information and gives them the opportunity to exercise it in good faith.

Complete Assistance in the preparation for the implementation of the SMR/CR can be obtained from us at Complaince Consultant Where we have experience in the banking sector from 2015/2016.

Source by Dr. Anand Wadadekar